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Friday, 28 February 2014

Cardiff Film & Comic Event.....


...which no one told me about until last night and completely by accident!

Cinebook Ltd Newsletter 74 - February 2014


Dear Reader,
This month is a bit of a Grzegorz Rosinski special, with two different volumes drawn by the legendary Polish artist coming out at the same time.
Our old friend Thorgal is first, finally returning home after many adventures – but it’s not that easy when your wife isn’t the meek, stay at home kind… Aaricia is no wallflower, and the happy ending will have to be earned!
In volume two of Lament of the Lost Moors, the first cycle of the adventures of Siobhán comes to a close. And amidst the war and conflict, revelations will be offered that may shake the foundations of her world…
Finally, Lucky Luke is back with another adventure, one that sees the Daltons take an unexpected step towards marital bliss and respectability. Well… That’s the idea anyway – the end result may not be quite so rosy!
Starting this year, we’re also bringing new series and new titles to you by making them available in digital format first. Kicking off with a bang, actually, with XIII Mystery – a series of one-shot tales each centred on one of the more striking secondary characters of cult series XIII. This month it’s deadly, sinister assassin-for-hire The Mongoose whose story you will discover. Expect surprises!


Our other new series is Wisher. Set in modern day London, it introduces Nigel, a carefree, successful young man with a talent for bringing people what they wish for. Unfortunately, Nigel will soon find himself involved in a deadly game of cat-and-mouse with some government agents that use… fairies as standard equipment! For these, and other titles new to Izneo’s catalogue, check out the ‘Digital’ section.
February with Cinebook – read on!

It is time at last for Thorgal to return to his family. However, Aaricia is not staying idle after her rescue by Jolan, and tries to put together a fleet to attack Shaigan’s stronghold – unaware that her husband is no longer the dreaded pirate lord… Read more

Urgent message for the Dalton brothers: the president has approved a special measure to combat overpopulation in the country’s prisons. They’re going to be… hanged! Their last hope lies in a little known law that would see them walk free if they were to marry… Read more

After her mother’s marriage to the mysterious Lord Blackmore, Siobhan, last descendant of the Kings of Sudenne, is now supposed to be safe from the hostility of the sorcerer who rules the country. Too many mysteries remain… Read more


North-American readers, to locate a comic book shop near you that stocks or can order these titles and many more, us this handy Read more

Or, if you’re a retailer yourself, please go to: Read more




Cinebook will exhibit at the London Book Fair, Stand i820, Earls Court Exhibition Centre, Warwick Road, London, UK

Cartoonist Club – Simon Chadwick
Comic Bits Online – Terry Hooper
Dave Ex Machina – Dave Lartigue
Forbidden Planet – Richard Bruton
MyETVmedia – Christophe Chanel
Women Write About Comics – Claire Napier
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Thursday, 27 February 2014

Newsletter 27 febbraio 2014

 
NEWSLETTER 27/2/2014
  
 

 
VALVOLINE STORY
 
Vi segnaliamo che dal 2 al 30 marzo a Bologna ci sarà una mostra che documenta e celebra il lavoro del gruppo Valvoline, sottolineando i suoi legami con le altre arti e il contesto culturale degli anni '80 in cui quest'esperienza maturò.
L'esposizione, su iniziativa della Fondazione del Monte di Bologna e Ravenna e a cura della casa editrice Coconino Press-Fandango, in collaborazione con Bologna Fiere e la Fiera del libro per ragazzi, si terrà nella sede della Fondazione del Monte (via delle Donzelle 2) con circa 180 opere e tavole originali a fumetti di tutti gli autori, numerosi inediti tra disegni, dipinti e bozzetti, foto e documenti audio e video.
L'inaugurazione sarà sabato 1 marzo alle ore 18 con la presenza di diversi autori.
In occasione della mostra uscirà il libro-documentario "Valvoline Story", ricchissimo di inediti, interviste e testimonianze, curiosità, disegni.

 
 
BilBOlbul Festival internazionale di fumetto fa parte della
Rete dei Festival del Contemporaneo di Bologna
Future Film Festival: 1 > 6 aprile 2014 - futurefilmfestival.org :: Live Arts Week: 8 > 13 aprile 2014 - liveartsweek.it :: Angelica- Festival Internazionale di musica: 2 > 31 maggio 2014 - aaa-angelica.com :: Biografilm: 6 > 16 giugno 2014 - biografilm.it :: Gender Bender: www.genderbender.it :: BilBOlBul: 21 > 23 novembre 2014 - bilbolbulnet

Wednesday, 26 February 2014

Bristol Expo News



 This from Bristol Comic Expo organiser Mal...



We just announced that we have Michael Golden attending as well as some of the regulars from 2000AD.

So far on list:

James O'Barr
Renee Whitterstater
Arthur Suydam
Michael Golden
Lee Townsend
Ben Willsher
Jon Davis-Hunt
Alec Worley
Patrick Goddard

expect a few more of the Bristol regulars will be long and we're looking to bring along either Mr Mills or Wagner to headline the UK side of things..

James O'Barr is introducing a special 20th anniversary HD screening of the Crow on the Sat. night for us with Q&A and signing afterwards at the showcase cine de-lux and tickets will be very limited for that one so a good thing to push ;)

Should have a full event programme up next week, loads going on this year and probably opening up a second venue due to demand (just waiting for confirmation on that one..)

That's about it for now, will make sure you get the latest as soon as we have it.

All the best,

Mal.

Tuesday, 25 February 2014

Bhob Stewart Nov. 12th 1937,Feb.24th 2014

For those who do not know, Stewart was credited with creating the term Underground Comix during a panel discussion at a comic convention in 1966.

Monday, 24 February 2014

Ghostbusters star Harold Ramis dies aged 69

From BBC News

Harold Ramis Ramis (right) found fame in 1984's Ghostbusters, which he co-wrote with Dan Aykroyd (centre)
Actor and director Harold Ramis, best known for the films Ghostbusters and Groundhog Day, has died aged 69

The star found fame as bespectacled ghost-hunter Egon Spengler in the Ghostbusters franchise in 1984.
But he was also a talented writer and director, whose credits included Caddyshack and Animal House.

 
"His creativity, compassion, intelligence, humour and spirit will be missed by all who knew and loved him," said his family in a statement.

Much-admired in Hollywood, Ramis's death prompted an outpouring of tributes on Twitter.

Billy Crystal, who starred in the director's mobster comedies Analyze This and Analyze That wrote: "Sad to hear my friend Harold Ramis passed away.

"A brilliant, funny, actor and director. A wonderful husband and dad. Big loss to us all."

Iron Man director Jon Favreau added: "No, no, not Harold Ramis. Worked for him years ago. He was the real deal. Growing up, his work changed my life. He will be missed."

"Harold Ramis was a brilliant, shining example for every comedy writer hoping to achieve excellence the field," wrote Family Guy creator Seth McFarlane.

US chat show host Seth Meyers called him "one of the all time greats", while Scrubs actor Zach Braff said: "If you're my age and got into comedy, Harold Ramis was one of the reasons. Life is fast and over too soon."
Groundhog Day Ramis wrote, produced and directed Groundhog Day, about an irascible TV weatherman forced to live the same 24 hours over and over
 
 
Born in Chicago to convenience store owners Ruth and Nathan, Ramis studied at Washington University in Missouri and, on graduation, briefly worked in a psychiatric ward.

He started his career as a writer by penning arts stories for his local newspaper and editing Playboy magazine's "party jokes" section.

 
"It was amazing how many of these jokes were written in pencil on three-ring notebook paper, or came from people who were incarcerated," he told The Chicago Reader. "It was also amazing how many of them dealt with farmers and farm animals.

"At the time - it was the late 1960s - the Playboy editors wanted to modernize the jokes a bit, to make them more counterculture. A big part of my job was changing 'the farmer' into 'a swinging advertising executive.'"

After leaving the magazine, he joined Chicago's renowned Second City improvised comedy troupe but said he realised his limitations as a performer after encountering John Belushi.

"When I saw how far he was willing to go to get a laugh or to make a point on stage, the language he would use, how physical he was, throwing himself literally off the stage, taking big falls, strangling other actors, I thought: 'I'm never going to be this big.'"

Film still from Stripes Ramis made a total of six films with Bill Murray, including military comedy Stripes
 
Instead, he played the straight man - acting as a sardonic foil to Bill Murray in the 18-rated army comedy Stripes, and playing the most straitlaced and scientifically-inclined of the Ghostbusters trio.

The film, a global smash in 1984, spawned a sequel in 1989 as well as a long-running cartoon series. A third instalment had been in development for several years.

Ramis acknowledged that the spectral comedy was his most memorable work but took pride in its longevity.

"People love Ghostbusters in a really big way," he said in 2009. "Parents loved it for their kids. Teachers loved it. 

"We got mail from teachers who said they loved that kids were playing Ghostbusters at recess because it was a non-violent game that didn't divide the kids into good guys and bad guys and the games were very co-operative. It's really had some power."

The film remains one of the most successful comedy movies of all time, with takings of more than $500m (£300m) adjusted for inflation.

After the sequel, Ramis developed his career behind the camera, directing former Ghostbuster Bill Murray in Groundhog Day and Robert De Niro in Analyze This.

His other films included The Ice Harvest, Bedazzled and prehistoric comedy Year One, his final movie, in 2009.
Harold Ramis Ramis received an American Comedy Award and a Bafta for screenwriting
 
He said that his time on a psychiatric ward had prepared him for directing Hollywood's elite.
"People laugh when I say that, but it was actually very good training," he told journalist Mike Sacks. "Not just with actors; it was good training for just living in the world.

"It's knowing how to deal with people who might be reacting in a way that's connected to anxiety or grief or fear or rage. As a director, you're dealing with that constantly with actors. But if I were a businessman, I'd probably be applying those same principles to that line of work."

Film producer Brian Grazer once called him "the father of the modern Hollywood comedy", saying his Animal House script was "thoroughly ripped off by the Porky's series" while "Caddyshack was ripped off by Happy Gilmore; Ghostbusters by Men in Black; and Groundhog Day by the Adam Sandler comedy 50 First Dates."

Ramis also inspired a new generation of film-makers, including Judd Apatow, who cast the director in his 2007 comedy Knocked Up.

More recently, he had directed episodes of NBC television's The Office." No matter what I have to say", he once declared, "I'm still trying to say it in comedic form."

He died of autoimmune inflammatory vasculitis, a rare disease that involves swelling of the blood vessels, his agent told the BBC.

The star had been quiet about his illness, which dated back to 2010, but several friends had visited him recently, including Bill Murray, from whom he'd been estranged for years, the Chicago Tribune said.
He is survived by his wife, Erica, sons Julian and Daniel, daughter Violet and two grandchildren.